Today I read a Book to Teenagers…

An actual, made out of dead trees, book. With pictures. To 16 and 17 year-old IB Diploma students. And they loved it.

Many, if not all of our students in international schools are stressed and juggling (perhaps too many) commitments as they work towards illusive goals. It’s so important to remind them to stop sometimes and do something different of their own choosing, like reading for pleasure, that they can enjoy.

After my story was done, we all had a blissful twenty minutes together of sitting quietly in the library and reading whatever we felt like.

In case you’re curious, here’s the video version of what I read to them:

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Tanya Batt – WOW!

What a great day.  We were lucky enough to have Tanya Batt visit with us all day, and the kids loved her dynamic storytelling and all of the experiences she had to share.  One thing I was particularly impressed with was Tanya’s ability to switch gears and tailor her sessions to work with quite a broad range of students – from three year olds in the early learning centre right up to ninth grade high schoolers.  I think that we’ll have some budding storytellers in our midst, and hopefully the experience will be a lasting one for our students.

On a bit of a tangent, this is one large blow against technology.  I really don’t think that you can duplicate these kinds of experiences through video conferencing or the like.  I think there will always be a certain level of personal interaction that can never be replicated by technology, and seeing the kids so engaged today really reinforced that idea.

Travels in the night

We’ve got Tanya Batt with us today to speak to our early learning, elementary and grade nine students.  It should be a good day, and I hope our kids enjoy their time with her.  I’ll post some reflections and photos of our day later.

From a personal perspective, it was cool going to meet her at the airport bus last night.  It felt like I had my own guest coming to visit, which I’m now really looking forward to.  In my dark and shady past I worked at a tourist information centre, (any Canadians remember “A place to live, a place to grow, Ontary ary ary O”? – they need to go back to that song) and I really enjoyed meeting travelers from all over and telling them about the local sights.  I don’t think it’s a stretch to say that working there was kind of a prelude to working in a library really – helping people find things, researching information about places to stay, and just generally telling people where to go 🙂